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Plan de estudios: UNIVERSITY MASTER'S DEGREE IN PENAL LAW SYSTEM
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UNIVERSITY MASTER'S DEGREE IN PENAL LAW SYSTEM

Code:
 D064

Credits:
 60
 
Publication date:
 Waiting for the publication

Title:
 Master (ECTS)
 
Fee:
 46,20
 1st registration credits
 

FIELD OF STUDY

Social and Legal Sciences

SYLLABUS

UNIVERSITY MASTER'S DEGREE IN PENAL LAW SYSTEM

TYPE OF EDUCATION

Combined Face-to-face and On line

LANGUAGE / S THAT IS OFFERED

Not defined

CENTRES WHERE IT IS TAUGHT

Faculty of Law

PROGRAMME JOINTLY SHARED WITH

UNIVERSITAT D'ALACANT - UNIVERSIDAD DE ALICANTE (ESPANYA)
UNIVERSITAT DE LLEIDA (ESPANYA)
UNIVERSITAT JAUME I DE CASTELLÓ (ESPANYA)
UNIVERSITAT ROVIRA I VIRGILI (ESPANYA)

EXAMINATION DATES

Enter the list of examination dates for this graduate programme.

SYLLABUS OFFERED

 

Legend: Not offeredNo teaching
UNIVERSITY MASTER'S DEGREE IN PENAL LAW SYSTEM
48 credits
 
12 credits
 
 
Once this block is approved, you get
MASTER'S DEGREE IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

OBJECTIVES

 

The aim of this Master’s degree is to provide specialised and integrated training for graduates in law, criminology, psychology, sociology, political sciences and other social sciences related to crime through the different disciplines involved in the criminal justice system (substantive criminal law, criminal procedure, criminology and victimology). The course takes a comprehensive approach to the in-depth study of all aspects involved in the criminal justice system, explaining how they operate and studying them from a crossdisciplinary perspective (partially covered in some degree courses such as law and criminology). Since this is fundamentally an academic course which also incorporates a research focus, in addition to an exhaustive study of substantive criminal law, criminal procedure, criminology (basically crime theories) and victimology, the course also aims to train students in research methodology. Thus, the ultimate aim is to equip students with the knowledge and methodological skills which, in addition to enabling them to conduct their first piece of research within the context of the Master’s Degree, will introduce them to the preparation of a doctoral thesis. 

To summarise, the aim of the present Master’s Degree is for students to gain a deeper understanding of the disciplines involved in the criminal justice system and of the research methodology corresponding to each of these disciplines. It is a hybrid course, combining substantive criminal law with criminal procedure and criminology, in which the disciplines involved in criminal law are addressed in conjunction, an approach not fully developed at degree level in either law or criminology. Thus, the fundamental intention is to complement the quality training of graduates in degrees designed from a criminological perspective and those from degrees with a more legal profile, in order to equip them for entry into the labour market or for further research in any of the disciplines comprising the Master’s Degree.  By providing an in-depth study of legal and criminological knowledge for criminology and law graduates respectively, the present Master’s Degree programme addresses the deficiencies identified in both the current law degree programmes as regards empirical disciplines, and also in the criminology degree programmes as regards criminal justice disciplines.

 

COMPETENCES


General Competences (CG)

  • 20.:Correct use of technical language, both orally and in writing.
  • 21.:Master a foreign language.
  • 22.:Master the ICTs.
  • 23.:Ability to apply the knowledge acquired and capacity to solve problems in new or little-known environments in broader contexts (multidisciplinary) within one's field of study.
  • 24.:Capacity to integrate knowledge and deal with the complexity of giving opinions on the basis of incomplete or limited information that include reflections on the social and ethical responsibilities associated with the application of one's knowledge and opinions.
  • 25.:Capacity to communicate one's own conclusions - and the knowledge and reasons supporting them - to both specialist and non-specialist audiences clearly and unambiguously.
  • 26.:Possess learning skills that allow one to continue studying autonomously.
  • 27.:Respect for the fundamental rights of the equality of men and women, the promotion of human rights and the values of a democratic, peaceful culture.
  • 28.:Capacity for teamwork.
  • 29.:Capacity to manage information appropriately.

Specific Competences (CE)

  • 1.:Understand the characteristics, concepts and procedures of the criminal justice system.
  • 2.:Understand the different ways of dealing with antisocial behaviour.
  • 3.:Understand the difference between antisocial behaviour and that with legal-penal implications.
  • 4.:Learn the elements of the penal concept of crime.
  • 5.:Definition of main criminal groups.
  • 6.:Understand the penal sanction system.
  • 7.:Understand the foundations of the punitive system.
  • 8.:Differentiate between the pacific and adversarial resolution of conflicts.
  • 9.:Understand the structure of the penal process.
  • 10.:Understand the mechanisms tending towards de-victimisation.
  • 11.:Understand the factors affecting the victimisation process.
  • 12.:Understand the theories of criminality.
  • 13.:Skilled use of criminological-empirical research methods.
  • 14.:Skilled use of legal research methodology.
  • 15.:Acquire critical awareness when analysing the penal system.
  • 16.:Capacity to give expert advice on possible responses to legal-penal problems.
  • 17.:Understand the factors that affect the design of criminal policies.
  • 18.:Understand the specific features of company criminality.
  • 19.:Understand the legal treatment of gender violence.

 

MASTER’S DEGREE: CREDITS AND SUBJECTS

 

 

Subject type

Credits

Compulsory(OB): Core Module

38

Optional (OP): Optional Module

12

 Master’s Final Project (OB)

  10

TOTAL CREDITS

60

 

DISTRIBUTION OF SUBJECTS BY YEAR/SEMESTER

 

FIRST SEMESTER 30 ECTS

SECOND SEMESTER 30 ECTS

MODULE I: CORE

MODULE II: OPTIONAL

CRIMINAL SENTENCING AND CRIMINAL POLICY

OB

7

NEW CRIMINAL BUSINESS LAW

OP

6

CRIMES AGAINST INDIVIDUAL AND COLLECTIVE LEGAL RIGHTS

OB

6

GENDER VIOLENCE: LEGAL PROVISIONS

OP

6

CRIMINAL PUNISHMENT SYSTEM

OP

6

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCEDURES

OB

9

NEW CHALLENGES AND TRENDS IN CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL POLICY

OP

6

CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORIES

OB

10

MODULE III: MASTER’S FINAL PROJECT

VICTIMOLOGY

OB

6

RESEARCH

OB

10

 

GENERAL COURSE PROGRAMME

 

The Master’s Degree in the Criminal Justice System is divided into three modules: a core module (38 credits), an optional module (12 credits) and a module corresponding to the Master’s Final Project (research, 10 credits).

It is envisaged that the course will last one academic year. Accordingly, the core module (38 credits) will be taught in the first semester, whilst the 12 credits corresponding to the optional subjects from the optional module, and the 10 credits corresponding to the Master’s Final Project module, will be taught in the second semester.

The aim of the core module is to extend the knowledge gained from students’ previous degrees of the subjects which are fundamental to the criminal justice system.

The core  module includes the following subjects:

- Criminal sentencing and criminal policy (7 credits): provides an analysis of questions related to criminal legal theory, processes of criminalisation and decriminalisation of punishable behaviour, questions related to sentencing and, lastly, an introduction to the study of the criminal punishment system.

- Crimes against individual and collective legal rights (6 credits): addresses the study of types of crime of particular relevance to the present criminal context, including criminal negligence, organised crime, computer crime and, lastly, certain crimes against individuals.

- Criminal justice procedures (9 credits): consitutes an exhaustive study of the criminal procedure structure, those involved, approved preventative measures, means of evidence and, lastly, the types of criminal procedures in existence.

- Criminological theories (10 credits):  involves an analysis of crime theories developed within the field of criminology, although questions such as criminal phenomenology will also be addressed.

- Victimology (6 credits): addresses the study of victimisation and recovery processes in relation to suffering a criminal action.

Teaching on this module is partially classroom-based. The classroom-based teaching block is in the first month of the first semester and takes place at the Jaume I University in Castellón throughout the month of October. The reason for choosing this campus for the classroom-based teaching block is twofold. Firstly, its central geographical location will facilitate the attendance of students resident in the surrounding areas of the cosignatory universities to the agreement. Secondly, the Joan Lluís Vives Institute University Network is also headquartered in Castellón, which will aid administrative support during the classroom-based stage. The classroom-based teaching block will conclude with an examination of the acquired knowledge. Once this stage has been completed, teaching will continue via the University of Leída Sakai virtual campus, and will consist of the study of tailor-made material and the provision of the information necessary to complete the step-by-step exercises for each of the subjects, which students will be required to present within the proposed timeframe.  These exercises will be corrected, and the average grade for the activities will form part of the continuous evaluation. Both a classroom-based examination and the e-learning activities will determine the final grade, which students must validate in the corresponding examination for each subject.

The aim of this module is for students to develop a deeper understanding of the rudiments of the criminal justice system, an awareness of the diversity of ways in which anti-social behaviour can be addressed, and a familiarity with the tools which will enable them to acquire such knowledge, namely, correct use of language and ICT.  Students are also expected to develop their abilities as regards addressing the resolution of a specific problem, as well as acquiring the capacity to work as part of a team in the design of some of the activities set.

Once the compulsory module has been successfully completed, students may take both the optional module and the Master’s Final Project module, in the second semester of the academic year.

The optional module aims to equip students with the tools necessary for the study of specific and crossdisciplinary subjects related to the various disciplines covered in the core module, and pertinent  to complemention of their training.  This module includes core subjects related to general aspects of the present criminal justice system and two subjects examining particular areas of criminal behaviour which are considered especially complex and specific: business crime and gender violence.  Students must choose two of the optional subjects from the following four:

- New criminal business law (6 credits): this subject will address both general questions related to criminal business law and the study of the types of crimes related to business activity.

- Gender violence: legal provisions (6 credits): this subject provides an in-depth analysis of the types of crime associated with gender violence, and the legal mechanisms for protecting victims of this kind of crime.  A criminological approach to this problem is also addressed.

- Criminal punishement system (6 credits): provides an in-depth study of existing criminal punishments and the problems related to their implementation.

- New challenges and trends in criminology and criminal policy (6 credits): addresses current issues regarding the guiding principles behind trends in criminal policy processes and criminology.

Teaching on this module is semi classroom-based, and subject to continuous evaluation.  In practice this implies a classroom-based teaching block of two eight-hour days for each of the optional subjects – based once again at the Jaume I University -  followed by various activites, similar to those of the core subjects,  organised by the University of Leida Sakai virtual campus, comprising study of materials, directed reading and exercises which will be used to assess the final grade awarded for the corresponding subject.

Students are expected to acquire extensive skills related to the contents of the first module, both in terms of all the crossdisciplinary contents involved and those presented in each of the disciplines comprising the criminal justice system.

Lastly, the third module (10 credits), consists of the Master’s final project, comprising supervised research. A tutor will be assigned to each student and  supervision will include an initial tutorial and various supervisory tutorials to monitor progress. The aim of the third module is for students to: consolidate and apply the knowledge acquired in the core module as well as the optional subjects taken concurrently with the third module; and to acquire skills in legal and criminological research methods.  In addition, students will be required to demonstrate a command of foreign languages through their recourse to literature in English, French, German or Italian.  Successful completion of this module includes an oral defence of the Master’s Final Project before an examining board comprising three professors involved in teaching the Master’s Degree .  This oral defence will take place between June and September of the academic year in which the student is enrolled.

As regards the skills students are expected to acquire during the completion of this module, in addition to consolidating those already introduced in the previous modules, students are required to demonstrate their command of a foreign language and to acquire proficiency in the use of legal and criminological research methods.

 

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS AND SELECTION CRITERIA

 

According to the Regulations of the University of Alicante, the following requirements must be complied to have access to official taught Master’s degrees:

  1. To be in possession of a SPANISH OFFICIAL GRADUATE DEGREE CERTIFICATE or other issued by an institution of higher education  within the EHEA (European Higher Education) that enables the holder to have access  to Master’s degrees in the issuing.
  2. To be in possession of an officially approved  FOREIGN HIGHER EDUCATION DEGREE CERTIFICATE that had been recognised as equal to the degree that allows access to the requested studies.
  3. To be in possession of a UNIVERSITY DEGREE CERTIFICATE obtained in a University or Higher Education Institution of COUNTRIES OUTSIDE THE EHEA, without the prior approval of their studies. In this case, the following should be considered:
  • Non- recognised degree certificates shall require a technical report showing an equivalence statement issued by the University of Alicante (ContinUA – Continuing Education Centre), for which the corresponding fee should be paid.
  • Access through this way does under no circumstances imply prior official approval of the holder’s degree certificate, nor its recognition for purposes other than studying a master's degree.

 

ADMISSION AND ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

 

1.- Admission Profile

Applicants should preferably hold a degree in Law or Criminology.  As regards Law graduates, they should be able to demonstrate an interest to specialise in criminal law. Accordingly, preference will be given to those who have taken optional subjects corresponding to criminal law and criminal procedure, and the grades obtained for these subjects, whether core or optional, will be taken into consideration.  Criminology graduates should be able to demonstrate an interest to specialise in the criminal justice system, including legal aspects, which form an important part of the Master’s Degree.  Therefore, first degree course contents and the grades obtained will be taken into consideration.  In this case, applicants may be required to extend or update their knowledge as regards criminal law.

In addition to the above, graduates from other disciplines within the social sciences related to Law and Criminology, such as psychology, sociology, etc., who are able to demonstrate that they have acquired a basic understanding of both criminal law and criminology, may be considered for admission to the Master’s Degree.

Furthermore,  applicants must have successfully completed university studies qualifying them for admission to the Master’s Degree, such as law, criminology, sociology, psychology or political sciences, or other degrees in the social sciences related to the criminal justice system. A reasonable level of knowledge of some of the subjects related to the criminal justice system will be necessary.

 

2.     Assessment criteria

 

Admission criteria:

  • A degree in Law or Criminology.
  • A degree in other areas of the social sciences, such as psychology, sociology or political sciences, related, albeit  indirectly,  to the criminal justice system.
  • Professional practice related to the criminal justice system, for example, legal professionals or technical staff in prisons, law, the police, children’s shelters or detention centres.
  • Previous academic record.

In order to guarantee a basic level of knowledge in the core subjects comprising module I, applicants holding degrees other than in Law or Criminology will be required to sit an entry examination.  The aim of this examination is to ensure a minimum level of knowledge in subjects which are basic to the Master’s Degree programme and the study of which is extensive throughout the course.  In the absence of a degree in Law or Criminology, or, where such knowledge has not formed an essential part of the other degrees presented for admission to the Master’s Degree (psychology, sociology or political science, among others), the required level in the core subjects will be demonstrated by passing the entry examination.

The body responsible for assessing applicants’ qualifications and achievements is the Master’s Degree Academic Committee.

 

 

PRE-ENROLMENT AND ENROLMENT

 

PRE-ENROLMENT +info

Students who intend to study for an officially recognised Master’s Degree at the UA should complete pre-enrolment in accordance with the guidelines and deadlines specified annually.

 

ENROLMENT +info

Following publication of the final list of those admitted to the course, an email containing a user password will be sent to successful applicants, enabling them to enrol via the Campus Virtual in accordance with the guidelines and deadlines specified annually.

In the registration process, the documents issued abroad must be official, duly notorised and translated. Further information:


NUMBER OF PLACES

 

COURSE NUMBER OF PLACES
2012-13 50
2013-14 30
2014-15 20
2015-16 20
2016-17 20

Focus

 

Research.

 

Degree course specialisation profile

 

Academic and research.

 

Professional Profile

 

The course addresses professional practice related to the criminal justice system, providing a quality, specialist training in the criminal justice system which combines legal, criminological and victimological perspectives.

 TIMESCALE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

 

1. Timescale for implementation of the new Master’s Degree Course

 

 

Academic year

Implementation of the Master’s Degree

 

2009-2010

1st year

 

2. Equivalence Recognition Procedures, where appropriate, between the current and the new course programme.

A credit equivalence table was drawn up in the academic year 2009-2010, detailing credit equivalence between the doctorate programme in the criminal justice system and the Master’s Degree course presented here.  The aim of this credit equivalence scheme is to facilitate entry to the Master’s Degree both for those doctorate programme students who, of their own volition, wish to change to the Master’s progamme and for those who are obliged to do so by the discontinuation of the doctorate progamme (for example, students who have not completed the necessary taught credits before dicontinuation of the doctorate programme this academic year, or who have not completed the research credits at that point – academic year 2008-09).

In the case of students from other universities, the Degree Study Committee will examine credit equivalence individually, comparing the course programme from the corresponding unversity (taking into account the areas and subjects successfully completed) with that of the Master’s degree, and applying the credit equivalence table mentioned above.

Irrespective of the above, the Study Committee will ensure that students do not miss an academic year as a result of the credit equivalence procedure, as long as this would not contravene the criteria for teaching quality established by regulations of a higher order (Spanish Ministry of Education, University of Leida, etc.).  To this end, a transitional enrolment scheme will be implemented to facilitate credit equivalence procedures.

 

3. Studies that will be discontinued and replaced by the proposed Degree course:

Inter-University Doctorate Programme in the Criminal Justice System.

 

 

Information about the Centre General information for students
  •  Faculty of Law
Campus de San Vicente del Raspeig
Ctra. de Alicante s/n 03690
San Vicente del Raspeig (Alicante)
Telephone:+ 34
96 590 3573
Fax:+ 34 96 590 9896
facu.dret@ua.es 
http://derecho.ua.es/en/

 

  •  Continuous Training Center (ContinUA)
         Ground Floor Germán Bernácer
         Telephone:
+ 34 96 590 9422
         Fax: + 34 96 590 9442
          continua@ua.es
          http://web.ua.es/en/continua

 

 

UA: General Regulations
 + Information about qualifications

 

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