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Course description
  ANATOMY

Competencies and objectives

 

Course context for academic year 2015-16

Anatomy comprises the study of the structures that can be seen macroscopically (without the aid of magnification techniques), as well as microscopically (using such techniques). Microscopic Anatomy is also called Histology because the use of the microscope is intended for the study of tissues and cells, the basic components of the body organs. Anatomy is the basis for medical practice and, by extension, the basis of many other health science disciplines. It is essential to have a thorough anatomical understanding, in order to identify and interpret situations of pathology and disease in the human body or in any of its organ systems. Observation and visualisation are the primary techniques the student must use to learn Anatomy, as they are the basis for a proper physical examination, either directly or using modern imaging techniques.

Given the profile of the Nutritionist/Dietitian as a healthcare professional, he/she must be able to perform tasks that benefit the health and wellbeing of people, including the prevention of diseases of different organ systems and the exchange of information with other healthcare professionals. To acquire the relevant skills, it is first necessary to gain a basic knowledge of the human body, which the subject Anatomy provides.

Anatomy is a 6 ECTS credit subject, which are equivalent to a total workload of 150 hours, including contact hours (lectures, practice, seminars, etc.) and self-study. Anatomy is taught in the first semester of the first year of the Degree. As a core subject, Anatomy is related to other core and compulsory subjects of the syllabus, whose timing must be precisely and coherently coordinated to ensure the acquisition of professional skills for a Graduate in Nutrition and Human Dietetics.

Thus, Anatomy is closely related to the following subjects: Biology, taught in the first semester, and Physiology and Biochemistry, taught in the second semester, which together comprise the basic training of the Undergraduate Degree. Anatomy is also essential to understand other compulsory subjects taught in later years, such as Nutritional Physiology and Pathophysiology, Dietotherapy and Pharmacology, Clinical Nutrition, Nutrition throughout the life cycle, etc. All of them require some prior anatomical knowledge on the general organisation of the human body, in order to deepen into their respective fields. Reciprocally, to understand the Anatomy basics it is necessary to advance into some concepts of these subjects that will be developed further in the Undergraduate Degree.

 

 

Course content (verified by ANECA in official undergraduate and Master’s degrees)

Specific Competences (CE)

  • E1 : Understand the anatomy of the human body at different stages of life.
  • E2 : Understand the foundations of anatomy and anthropometry.
  • E3 : Understand and handle basic laboratory material and techniques related to Human Anatomy.

 

Specific transversal competences of the degree course :>>Foreign language proficiency

  • CT1 : Read and understand texts in a foreign language.

 

Specific transversal competences of the degree course :>>IT and information competences

  • CT2 : Show computer and information system skills and abilities.

 

Specific transversal competences of the degree course:>>Oral and written communication competences

  • CT3 : Show oral and written communication skills.

 

General Competences of the Degree Course (CG):>>Basic training module

  • 2 : Understand the structure and function of the human body from molecular level to the complete organism at different stages of life.

 

 

 

Learning outcomes (Training objectives)

No data

 

 

Specific objectives stated by the academic staff for academic year 2015-16

THEORY OBJECTIVES

1. To indicate the planes of the anatomical reference position and terms allusive to body movements.

2. To define the methods of anatomical study and their clinical interest for professional practice.

3. To describe the body components and regions including localisations and anatomical relations between the organs of the different organ systems.

4. To define the morphological characteristics of embryonic and fetal human development.

5. To establish the general anatomical characteristics of Osteology, Arthrology and Myology that constitute the locomotor system, its functional anatomy and clinical application.

6. To identify the macroscopic characteristics of the components of the vertebral column, head and neck, and their functional anatomy and practical clinical interest.

7. To identify the macroscopic characteristics of the components of the trunk (thorax, abdomen and pelvis), and their functional anatomy and practical clinical interest.

8. To identify the macroscopic characteristics of the components of the upper and lower limbs and their functional anatomy and practical clinical interest.

9. To describe the macroscopic structure of the organs constituting the integumentary system, their functional anatomy and practical clinical interest.

10. To describe the macroscopic structure of the organs constituting the respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune systems, and their functional anatomy and practical clinical interest.

11. To describe the macroscopic structure of the organs constituting the digestive, urinary, reproductive and endocrine systems, and their functional anatomy and practical clinical interest.

12. To describe the general anatomical structure and the components of the nervous system (central, peripheral, autonomous) and sensory organs, and their functional anatomy and practical clinical interest.

PRACTICE OBJECTIVES

1. To view images and videos about methods of image exploration and to compare morphological techniques for the study of the human body constitution.

2. To use anatomical models, images, videos and electronic resources to identify and describe the organogenesis in the embryonic development of the human body.

3. To use anatomical models, images, videos and electronic resources to identify and describe the components of each of the organ systems in general and to recognise the morphological features of all the organs localised in the different topographical regions of the human body.

4. To use the appropriate laboratory material to perform the dissection of an animal organ and macroscopically identify all its parts.

5. To use information and communication techniques for the morphological study of the human body and to orally present collaborative works.

 

 

 

General

Code: 27501
Lecturer responsible:
GOMEZ VICENTE, MARIA VIOLETA
Credits ECTS: 6,00
Theoretical credits: 1,20
Practical credits: 1,20
Distance-base hours: 3,60

Departments involved

  • Dept: OPTICS, PHARMACOLOGY AND ANATOMY
    Area: HUMAN ANATOMY AND EMBRIOLOGY
    Theoretical credits: 1,2
    Practical credits: 1,2
    This Dept. is responsible for the course.
    This Dept. is responsible for the final mark record.

Study programmes where this course is taught